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Greenpeace Swansea volunteers show the love for their local area with a giant heart and community clean

ON Saturday February 26, Greenpeace Swansea created a giant heart on Swansea beach, as part of the Climate Coalition’s annual Show the Love campaign, which shows what people love and don’t want to lose to climate change.

A dozen people turned up to create the big heart in the sand, and later that day, six people carried out a community clean on the beach, and collected half a dozen bin bags of rubbish. 

Adèle Williams, a volunteer with Swansea Greenpeace, said:

“I was shocked that we collected number of bags of rubbish during the community clean. It’s also essential that we reduce the amount of single-use plastic we produce in the UK, to help keep our local area clean, and to reduce the amount of energy we use in producing and dealing with throw away plastic.”

Swansea beach has been particularly badly hit with rubbish since lockdown eased, and with the opening of the new Arena, people are keen to take responsibility to clean up the area & make it welcoming to visitors.

That’s why Swansea Greenpeace is calling for is calling on the Welsh Assembly Government to implement a Just Transition away from fossil fuels to renewables, to roll-out a nationwide programme to make people’s homes warmer and more energy efficient and to invest in green public transport, walking and cycling.

Greenpeace volunteers also want to see a reduction in single-use plastic of at least 50% by 2025.

In the short-term, we also need a windfall tax on big oil and gas companies, so that the money can be used to help people who are struggling to pay their bills due to the energy price rise. is calling on the Government to implement a Just Transition away from fossil fuels to renewables, to roll-out a nationwide programme to make people’s homes warmer and more energy efficient and to invest in green public transport, walking and cycling. 

Greenpeace volunteers also want to see a reduction in single-use plastic of at least 50% by 2025. In the short-term, we also need a windfall tax on big oil and gas companies, so that the money can be used to help people who are struggling to pay their bills due to the energy price rise. 

Alison Broady, coordinator of Swansea Greenpeace, added: “The climate crisis can feel scary, but for me, taking part in Show the Love is a really powerful way to come together with other people in my local area to call on decision-makers, from name of Council to the UK Government to actually deliver on our legally – binding climate targets and create a better, fairer, greener world for everyone.’