WITH the passing of Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II, many goods and titles will have to change so they no longer bear the Queen’s symbols, but will display her son and heir, King Charles III. 

Here are some of the changes that will need to go ahead now that Charles has been appointed King.

Money 

There are 4.5bn sterling bank notes in circulation around the UK with the Queen’s face on them. They are estimated to be worth a combined £80bn.

New coins and notes will need to be designed and minted or printed. 

They are not expected to appear in circulation for some time. Replacement of the new coins and notes are likely to take two years. 

Coins displaying Elizabeth II did not appear until a year after her accession to the throne and notes with her majesty’s face took eight years to finally reach circulation.

Coins that will feature the new King will show him facing to the left, whereas Queen Elizabeth faced to the right. 

This tradition began in the 17th century to alternate the way successive monarchs are facing.

Elizabeth II’s coins are expected to stay in use until they are gradually replaced.

The Queen’s head also features on some $20 banknotes in Canada, on coins in New Zealand, and on all coins and notes issued by the Eastern Caribbean central bank, as well as other parts of the Commonwealth.

Stamps

The new King will soon begin to feature on stamps in Britain and others in the Commonwealth. 

It is likely that Charles III has already sat for such sculptures and portraits. He will need to approve the design before the new stamps are available for use. 

Postboxes

New postboxes could feature the new King’s cypher. Currently, postboxes across the country display Elizabeth II’s ERII cypher. 

70 years later, some postboxes with King George VI’s GR cypher remain in use today.

Queen’s Council

In the UK, Queen’s Counsel (QC) refers to a set of barristers and solicitors who the monarch appoints to be a part of Her Majesty’s Counsel learned in the law.

The title switches to King’s Counsel (KC) now a king reigns.

In criminal court cases, the R to denote the Crown now stands for Rex rather than Regina (queen).

Stationery and business cards may need to be reprinted to reflect the change in the post-nominal letters.

The English national anthem

The words of the English national anthem will change from “God save our gracious Queen” to “God save our gracious King” with substitutions of “him” and “he”.

This is a matter of tradition and is not law.

Passports

The King no longer needs his own passport. As for the rest of the UK, passports will be issued in his name.

The wording in new passports will be changed at some point in the near future.

Her Majesty’s Passport Office will become His Majesty’s Passport Office, as is the case with HM Armed Forces and HM Prison Service.

Cyphers

The new monarch will need a new Royal Cypher – the monogram impressed upon royal and state documents.

The Queen’s ERII features on traditional police helmets and postboxes.

While English queens use the St Edward’s crown, or a variant of it, kings traditionally use the more rounded Tudor crown.

Flags

Thousands of flags emblazoned with EIIR will need to be replaced, from those flying outside police stations across the UK to the standard used on a naval ship when a general is on board.

Military regiments fly “Queen’s colours,” many of which are embroidered with a gold EIIR; the fire service ensign includes her initials; and countries where the Queen remains head of state, such as Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, have personal flags for the Queen that are flown when she visits.

While the Royal Standard represents the Sovereign and the United Kingdom, the Queen’s own flag was unique to her and could only be flown by her.

It is possible that the royal standard (the quartered flag that flies wherever the monarch is in residence) could also change. The version used by the Queen includes one quarter representing Scotland (a lion rampant), one for Ireland (a harp), and two representing England (three lions passant), however, there is no symbol for Wales.

As Charles III will need a new personal flag as King, he may incorporate a Welsh element.