WALLY THE WALRUS, who has not been seen in Tenby since Monday seems to have made his way to Cornwall.

The Atlantic mammal had been in west Wales since first being spotted in March at

Nathaniel Barry spotted the artic creature, thinking at first it was a large seal.

A photo was then posted on the Facebook page of Padstow Sealife Safaris on Wednesday.

A spokesperson for Padstow Sealife Safaris said on Wednesday (May 19): “This afternoon our passengers and crew were absolutely astounded to spot what they first thought was an exceptionally large seal, only for it to pop up and reveal a pair of tusks!

“Walruses are native to Arctic waters, so this individual is sadly extremely far from home and thought to be the same individual that has been spotted in Ireland and, more recently, spending a few weeks in Wales, where it has affectionately been named Wally.

“It had been hoped that as the water temperatures increase, the walrus would make its way back up north to cold water and closer to home, but he seems to be doing the opposite.

“He seemed to be on the move so is unlikely to hang around in the area but if spotted again, it is important to give the walrus plenty of space and respect.

We hope Wally can find his way home soon as he must be quite lonely so far from others of his kind.”

There was speculation abound on social media if the Cornwall authorities could help move Wally back home, but nature expert, Llyn Redhead replied to the speculation on Facebook saying:  “Getting involved in such an exercise [moving Wally back to his home range] would cause the walrus so much stress it would likely kill him…. as it is leave him alone and when the mating instinct kicks in he will find his way home in no time …

“Wally is a juvenile male and as such is finding his flippers ….as a lone male he will soon move on when he wants to and will head off in search of a female in his own time the same as he came south in his own time… he is currently healthy and looking after himself perfectly well, I have spoken at great length to a marine biologist and ecologist about Wally so can put your mind at rest … the only risk to his wellbeing are humans!”