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Politics South Wales Torfaen

Takeaway given permission to continue operating from shipping container kitchen

Tin Can Kitchen operates from a shipping container (Pic: Tin Can Kitchen)

A TAKEAWAY that started during 2020’s Covid lockdown has been given permission to continuing operating from its shipping container kitchen. 

Tin Can Kitchen started as a “street food inspired” delivery service in May 2020 from a shipping container in the car park of the What! Stores in Rogerstone, Newport, before opening at a second location, this time in the staff car park of the chain’s Cwmbran outlet at the Court Road Industrial Estate, Llantarnam. 

This photograph shows where Tin Can Kitchen’s container is located in the staff car park at the What! store in Cwmbran (Pic: Torfaen County Borough Council)

The takeaway has been serving pizzas, burgers and barbecue grilled food from the 2.64m-high, 6.06m-wide container in Cwmbran since October 2022 and the application, made by Tin Can Kitchen and supported by What!, stated it had not been considered that planning permission was required for a container. 

Torfaen Borough Council approved the planning application for the “retrospective installation of a shipping container for use as a hot food takeaway” with amended opening hours of 8.30am to 6pm on Monday through to Saturday and from 10am to 6pm on Sundays. 

There is no customer seating provided but there is space for customers, and delivery drivers, to park when collecting orders. 

The application was supported by a detailed report prepared by planning agents Lichfields setting out various planning policies and that the location wouldn’t be at odds with existing local and national policies that “café/take-away food outlets” are “generally more appropriate in town centre or established neighbourhood centre locations”. 

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Planning officer Simon Pritchard said the “small size of the container” isn’t considered to have an “adverse impact” or undermine the policies intended to protect town centres. 

It was also accepted that its location meant it it is likely to be used by staff and customers of other nearby businesses, including What! customers.

Arguments the business wouldn’t be able to find a similar sized shop, or favourable rents, were also accepted. 

The size and location, in the staff car park, also meant the use isn’t reducing land for potential industrial use and, as it is near bus stops and close to residential properties on Llantarnam Road, but still some 100m away, it is considered a sustainable location because it would serve those already at the industrial estate.

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