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Letterston woman found guilty of possession of heroin

A HEROIN supplier from Letterston has been found guilty of possessing heroin with intent to supply at Swansea Crown Court this week. 

Sarah Jane Elyse Badrock, 36, admitted to being a heroin addict and claimed she bought the Class A drug in an attempt to prevent the pain from her injured ankle she acquired following a sprained ankle whilst working as a carer in 2020. 

She also claimed that it was easier to buy the drug than source painkillers via the NHS. 

Badrock appeared in Swansea Crown Court to deny possession of 24.09g of diamorphine heroin with intent to supply, as well as a further charge of being concerned in the supply of Class A diamorphine. 

Badrock made 13 journeys from her home in Jubilee Close, Letterston to Nelson, near Merthyr Tydfil, between October 22 and December 21, 2020. 

On each journey, Badrock bought a 3.5g measure of heroin which she claimed was for her own controlled personal use. 

She said she travelled 200 miles each time as she wanted to keep her controlled addiction a secret. 

Her barrister, counsel Jon Tarrant, said: “It has brought her shame and embarrassment,

“It [heroin] only revealed itself in the confines of her bedroom and it was a private, dark secret which, if it was to be leaked, was going to be life changing.”

Prosecution Counsel, Mr Ian Wright, responded: “Why did she make 13 round trips to the Rhymney Valley that would cost a considerable amount of money in petrol when she claims her heroin addiction was controlled?

“She’s pulling wool over our eyes.”

Badrock was apprehended by police on the A40 near St Clears in the early hours of December 20, 2020. She pulled a condom from inside her bra, which contained a large quantity of heroin which had a street value of £3,000. 

Badrock insisted it was for her personal use and that the Class A drug would help her pain over the 2020 Christmas Covid lockdown. 

Ian Wright asked the jury: “You must bring to this trial your own common sense,

“She claims she bought the heroin because she couldn’t get prescribed medication for her ankle pain.

“Really? We’re all struggling to get appointments with our GPs but do we take the leap to buy heroin?

“This is the real world, so what does your common sense tell you about that explanation? It’s nonsense.”

He also questioned the large amount of heroin that was found in Badrock’s possession when she was apprehended by the police.

“If you’re using a heavily addictive drug such as heroin and you have a large quantity in front of you, can you ration your use and regulate it, or do you just use as much as you can, as often as you can? 

“This is why heroin users only buy small amounts on a daily basis. But the defendant was found in possession of a very substantial amount.

“We’ve heard the defendant say that she has had a difficult life where she was deceiving people about her use of heroin because she was ashamed of what she was doing but this is precisely what she’s doing here today. She’s deceiving you.”

After a three and a half hour deliberation, the jury found Badrock guilty of both counts.

Badrock was remanded in custody to await her sentence which will be delivered on October 14 following a full probation report.

Judge Wayne Beard commented: “This is going to be an inevitable custodial sentence which should begin as soon as possible,

“There is no advantage to be gained by not placing you in custody immediately.”